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of conservation of energy, a law so basic that every respectable 31st century -- 21st century scientist will declare it thoroughly right. while i in exasperation am trying to get logic across to you, wham, a pinprick shows its head. it's what sid cysts d physicists will someday call a singularity. i'm stunned. this simply does not make sense. but you stay cool and act as if nothing is happening. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy, and sure enough, it has three properties that have never existed before. three properties that if common sense prevailed should not exist. those properties are time, space and speed. time, space and energy. how in the nonexistent world did the nothingness pull this off? the pinprick keeps whooshing outward like the rubber sheet of a trap lean on a growth binge, unfurling as a space-time manifold. i'm stunned. what the heck is space? what in the world is time? what is powering all the speed? who in the world invented these peculiar things? and if they weren't invented, how the hell did the utter emptiness burp them out? while i'm s
. it is within our reach to lead in job growth and energy independence. it is within our reach to balance our budget and meet the needs of our people. our place, kan., must show the path, the difficult path for america to go in these troubled times. .. the and >> we and shannon >> thank you. >> that was governors sam brownback with the state of the state address. we now go to senator anthony headley for the democratic response to enact we have been talking that the string that we have time. we have talked about how i have a dream. we will somehow realizes principles and the declaration of independence. i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words", clairborne carson recalls his march on washington. it is part of three days of the tv this weekend on monday featuring authors and books from the inauguration. president obama, and martin luther king jr. >> every weekend latest nonfiction authors and books are featured on booktv. you can see past programs and schedules our website and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> congress talked about avoiding
all of the work that are more than 100 scholars do here. those for priorities are energy and climate, opportunity and well being, managing global change, and growth through innovation. this is i think exactly the right moment to be having today's event. we are in a period of transition in our national leadership here in the capital, of course. we have a new treasury secretary, chief of staff coming in. we'll be having a new commerce secretary, labor secretary, and, of course, the 113th congress is settling in on capitol hill. the forum is going to address the issues of how to reinvigorate our economy, how to strengthen competitiveness, and how to create jobs. we're going to have three panels. the first on advancing industry and manufacturing. the second on deficit reform, and the third on improving government performance. the participants here today include brookings scholars, outside experts, and private sector representatives and leaders. our discussions will reflect a lot of the research that goes on here at brookings, and you will be able to find a number of examples of that rese
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote th
are getting a good deal in terms of energy prices. that is why we're going to be legislating to make companies put people on the lowest available tariffs. that is something that undecided of the house we're doing which will help all families. >> as a diabetic can i welcome the fact that last year the prime minister lit up number 10 for the first time on world diabetes day? one-third of all the prime minister leaders have got either, are either obese or their overweight. yet they consume cans of coke and pepsi that contain up to eight teaspoons of sugar. what steps is the prime minister imposing to take to engage manufacturers in the war against sugar? if we don't act now, the next generation will be overwhelmed by diabetes epidemic. >> i think the right honorable friend is absolutely right to raise this issue. it is one of the biggest health challenges that we face in our country, a public health challenge that we face. he's right to highlight the problem of excessive eating of sugar. that is why we challenge business to a responsibility deal to try to reduce levels of sugar, and that has had
and challenging issues facing each new city and town. energy, infrastructure, budgets, finance, crime. and i want you to know that we, the president and i come in the important part of that is the president, continues to be absolutely committed to do all we can to help the city steel with the immense problems take it rests upon them as a consequence of diminished tax bases and the consequence of housing significant portion of the public and states in the most need. we are committed to having a third phase of the so-called big deal and the budget. we are of the view but just as it took during the clinton administration, it didn't happen in one fell through to get our economy in great shape and move towards a balanced budget. it started out for three phases. started off with president bush's actions. first president bush in terms of taxation before president clinton took office in the action the president took in 94 and 97. well, we think there is a third phase here they consider country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to gdp, deficit to gdp down around 3%, which is all economists are
by the slides, was energy slashed proposal. we went from kitty hawk to luna in 60 something years, and sideways almost completely the last 40. that's an enormous gap. was that a function of us going through live -- low-hanging fruit with energy star system -- with systems for energy, or was that a function of military budgeting, or is it more than that? so first question is, was information technology the real big mess? or is energy and/or propulsion after failure to do anything fair for the last 40 years also part of our miss and the reason here today? >> oh, well, certainly it's a great candidate, and you can see the exponential rise of it. and that happens for lots of areas like energy, transport. but these are saturated. here's some of the candidates. we have doubled -- up next to a, here's a flying car by the way, for those who care about flying cars. you can buy this. they came out this year. and it's really kind of fun i think. i mean, today's era car. it's not completely dead. people have largely not notice that we have increase agricultural productivity a great deal and that's not so m
. look, i said this to my be staff today, i get a lot of psychic energy from being the mayor of the city, but yet i'm there, there's managers who get the job done every single day whose names you never hear about. i'm very proud to have been able to give a modicum of support to the incredible work you're doing. but you know there are heroes of light and energy that are working within covenant house in newark that are making transformative changes. there is a young kid one day that's going to be born to one of the children there that you'll never know their name who's going to know love. if you look into the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star -- [laughter] but just think to yourself that that's hundreds of billions of light years away and many of of those stars that you're actually looking at are gone. they no longer exist n. the billions of years it's taken for that light to get to you, the star is gone. but the energy and light a body gives off while it's alive goes on forever. people be, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light
that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7
. and then to tell you about this movement she would light up and got energy talking about the movement and excited about and i couldn't understand for her that was fulfilling because she felt this is the reason that my life has gone the past that it's gone this is what it's all been about. >> bernice did your mother and your family stay in the same house? >> after daddy was assassinated we stayed in the same house to get in fact the house wasn't purchased until 1966. my father had been influenced and he was struggling so she set look you have a wife and children and we have to have a place. they always talked about the fact that one day he probably would die a tragically. he said that's going to be my space. so he always anticipated that and new he knew so she made sure she brought that out and they were in the house until. >> or your grandparents on your mother's side or father's side? >> i visited my grandparents and alabama every summer for two weeks and i helped my grandmother with -- i helped her around the table setting up the dishes at the table and watching her cook and then alternatively
of of reported impacts that we had seen. water resources, energy, wildfire. and one of the things you order in the last discussion and in this one that is the underappreciated aspect of the impacts of drought and air ridty, the loss of ecosystem sources as they support and supply tourism, recreation, clean water and clear air. we do not have any sense of what the costs of those multiple impacts are. we know a bit about the insured impacts from agriculture, but so, therefore, what needs to be considered? the indicators, as margaret is saying, about how people are economically impacted, but as critically how they're socially impacted. if we're to put plans into place, we have to and how do you know they're working? the indicators include the development of people's capacity to respond. not simply the number of plans, but what in those plans allows the inclusion of information. that's what we call tracking the outcomes. that's the kind of indicators. the combination, certainly, of the physical system, the social and economic, but also the capacity engaged for decision making. that's three aspe
in job growth and energy independence. it is within our reach to balance our budget and meet the needs of our people. our place, kansas, will show the path, the difficult path, for america to go in these troubled times. like kansas newspaper publisher william allen white once said, there is just one way to stop progress in america, and that is to hire some hungry earthquake to come along and gobble up kansas. we have been placed here for a reason and our season is short. our needs are great. let us build a better state and let's do it now. thank you, may god bless you and may god continue to bless the great state of kansas. have a great year. [applause] thank you, thank you. >> coming up live on a companion network c-span, today attorney general eric holder will be speaking about reducing gun violence in remarks before the u.s. conference of mayors. he we joined by transportation security administration on pistol. that gets underway on 11:30 a.m. also this afternoon a discussion on immigration, trade and safety along the u.s.-mexico border. >> i, barack hussein obama, do solemnly swear
, creativity is being expended, chances are being taken, people are focusing enormous energy and attention on what you admitted in your own testimony is a terrible problem. i'm wondering how these experiments will be evaluated, with the learning will be shared, how the public will be informed of whether or not all these excellent input actually yield results and how soon, so i'm wondering what the plan is for disseminating the best practices if any of these things turn out to be if not the magic bullet, then a part of the arsenal that becomes the way that we combat sexual violence in the military, pardon the mother terrie delusion. >> thank you for the question. one of the lines of inference is one that you're commenting on and focusing on, the linus effort of assessment. so there are some things in place here that allow us to -- we recognize we have to continue to look at ourselves. and one that i've actually been sharing with my colleagues in the services and so forth is that we have to assess our programs with an eye towards taking the best practices and making them the common practices
cocoa accord which are really like. a variety of energy drinks. an energy drinking columbia, a group produces which has a great flavor to it. again, it is not like drinking red bull. it is a very nice kind of stimulant. it would be much better for you. all kinds appointments, a variety of red. also these -- what they call titos which are basically cheese puffs that the government is distributing the kids. a free. i thought there were awful, but i guess the kids like them. i can send that i really hate coca toothpaste. but my point is that there are a variety of products that have very good uses and should be available not only in these countries, but also in the international market. a variety of uses beyond what coca-cola uses for flavoring. another hypocrisy of the @booktv of the hypocrisy that is pointed to in the book is related to the conventions. i was really struck reading your book. i had not realized it. this cozy relationship which in the u.s. drugs are for decades and the president of coca-cola. very cozy relationship. in the end the 1961 un single convention on narcotics,
naturally. but of course i have the energy lightbulbs. to change an entire house to energy saver lightbulb saves as much electricity -- i should say, as much carbon in a year as the need to walkable neighborhoods they spent a week. the whole gizmo green gadget discussion, what can i buy to make myself more sustainable is the wrong discussion. should be where can i live and how can i live to contribute less than the answer is city. fundamentally the opposite of the american eats those from jefferson on, cities are the morals, health, freedom of man. if we continue to pile upon ourselves and cities in europe, we shall take to beating one another as they do there. i was jefferson. and that continued to make sense back in the 1700s of the biggest bipartisan transportation was fertilizer. that's not the case now. it's a longer discussion. all through a lot of discussions. there are national crises. with a national economic crisis, which is only going to get tougher. a national health crisis and the sandy proved all too clear a couple weeks ago, global warming is beginning to affect us dramatica
. probably think power point is an energy drink, except they don't know what an energy drink is, either. obviously the data tell us we should fire these old college jerries or let them retire gracefully. but hold on. don't fire anybody yet. the air force academy study had another relevant finding about student performance over a longer horizon. carolyn west found math and science, the students witch more experience and highly credential ed instructors in the introductory course does better in they mandatory follow-on courses than students in the introductory courses. one logical interpretation is that the less experienced instructors are more likely to teach to the test. in the introductory courses. this produces impressive exam scores and happy stunts when it comes to fill ought instructor evaluation. meanwhile, the old crusty professor,s, whom we nearly fired, focus less on the exam than on the concept which is matter most in the follow yawn courses and life after the air force academy. we need to evaluation teachers and professors, we just have to do it wrong. in the long-term policy
of very important challenging issues that is facing each of these cities and towns. energy, infrastructure, budgets, finances, crime, and i want you to know that we, the president and i, the important part of that is the president -- continues to be absolutely committed to do all we can to help the cities deal with the immense problems that get thrust upon them as a consequence of diminished tax bases and the consequence of housing, the significant portion of the public and their states that are in most need. we're committed to having a third phase of the so-called big deal on the budget. we're of the view that just as it took during the clinton administration, it didn't happen in one fell swoop to get our economy in great shape and move toward a balanced bump started off with three phases. started with president bush's actions, the first president bush, in terms of taxation, before president clinton took office. then the actions the president took in '94 and then in '97. well, we think there's a third phase here that can set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt, the gd
engaged novel. and now between them has, i think, given both of them an awful lot of energy. so yes, i think it is not entirely true to say what i said. i just thought it was worth saying once. [applause] but i won't say it again. [applause] i think it can be created. you might write a poem in response to another poem. we're just working in a conversation in a way. poets do that quite a lot. you are continuing to collect discussion. i also think that writers spend a lot of time alone and we really like hanging out with each other. we don't want to make too many enemies. [laughter] [applause] time for the last question. i wonder about the purposes of the biographer not only a choice of how they were going to write about it but who. >> yes, that's a perfect question. i think there are multiple purposes. again, i think that is always defined by the person writing the biography. one is trying to get answers to questions that interest them. and so i think that if somebody writes about henry james committee may be looking at that aspect to try and understand about secrecy and uncovering and
think power point is the energy drink. [laughter] except they not know what that is either. of is the the data tells us we should fire them or let them retire gracefully. hold on. don't fire anybody at. the air force academy study had a relevant finding was student performance over a longer horizon. in math and science those who have more experience and highly credentialed instructors come to do better with the mandatory courses than those who have less experience in the introductory courses. one logical interpretation is a less experienced instructors more likely to teach to the test that has impressive exam scores and happy students with the instructor evaluation. but deal crusty professors that we nearly fired one paragraph ago focus less on the exam and more on the concepts that matter most in the following courses and in life after the air force academy. we need to evaluate teachers and professors to make sure we do our right. long-term policy challenge bruited in statistics is develop a system that rewards the real value added. this is a work in progress. we'll stop t
, giving energy that is not entirely true. i thought it was worth saying once. [laughter] i will not say it again. [laughter] >> it cannot be creative. like him as a poet he may write a poem in response to another poem you continue the conversation. poets of do that a lot to argue do not agree that continues the conversation. we don't want to hang out with each other and make too many enemies. [laughter] >> last question? >> i am curious about the purpose of biography or how much the biographer influences his or her choice but how they approach it is. >> there are multiple purposes. to a certain extent is the person riding the biography. inevitably, when trying to get answers to questions, i think if somebody writes about henry james who is gay, they may look at that aspect to understand a secrecy, and covering, emotions, a translating into the argument. how do they do that in to a creative way? with the daily task of raising children to be a wife, lover? part of what people do is basically use people who were well known or have written things that come value as a guide to life. but ofte
, including the electric grid and of course continue to encourage any energy independence. the resolution of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama could somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration, to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation the country so desperately needs. what is not a subject of this paper, one can ask and will he be reelected? rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term as popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. so does romney. it's interesting to note only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity rating at the time of the reelection, as low as their election. but for wilson, harry truman and george w. bush. these presidents experienced troubled or failed second terms. history aside, one cannot discount the possibility obama would win by based on statistics like this, but because the electorate judges had the best alternative of the two ca
infrastructure, including the electric grid. and, of course, continue to encourage energy independence. the resolution of the supply of unfilled housing should be tried but only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find a unique instrument required to work with this administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with the congresswoman to pass legislation that this country so desperately needs. although it's not a -- one can ask will he be reelected. historically rarely have presidents been real elected to a second term with popular ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests, but so does romney. interesting to note that only three of the 19 presidents elected to a second term as relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their reelection. these are woodrow wilson, truman and george w. bush. these presidents experienced trouble or failed second terms. history aside, one cannot discount the possibility of obama would win not based on statistics like this, but because the electorate elected him the best alternative of the two candi
they will not be the drag on the economy that they have been the last few years. energy, the energy industry in the u.s. is much stronger. consumers are more optimistic coming university of michigan publishes the index of consumer sentiment which is one of the very best guides to how consumers are feeling. and as long as the fiscal policy thing isn't getting too messed up, the consumers seem to be a little bit more upbeat. so there are some positives, but i want to be clear that while we've made some progress, there's still quite a ways to go before we will be satisfied. >> well, let me shift gears a little bit. certainly as you well know, there are some very vocal critics of fed policy. and i wonder what you might say to those who argue that, for example, the policy that is maintain interest rates at such low levels has asked the taken some of the pressure off of congress to try to address these fiscal challenges, and that the massive asset purchases has created extremely high risk, perhaps underappreciated risks for future inflation. >> well, the critics on both sides, you know, you should give the
companies, and it is producing more than ever in energy from other sources, both domestically and from other places, and i think that's great. i think that we import around a million dollars a day from venezuela. this is me speaking. i'm not being paid by anybody but i sure would love to see a million barrels of oil coming down the pipeline from alberta to houston. within that the need? is that a coincidence? i think that would be terrific. so, i remember threats by the governor of venezuela not a single drop of oil will go to the united states. great. i think what we need to do is remove that leverage over our economy and we have done it and we should continue to do so. >> it's my understanding, this is a question of fact that it's my understanding the only country that is playing is really the united states and basically they are getting a discounted rate so on terms of the more favorable to respect people on the audience know more about this. >> i don't know who is paying what for what. >> venezuela is subsidizing cuba and the cuban economy at the rate of $4 billion a year out of 60 billi
about immigration and energy policy, this one is going to have to get resolved one way or another before we can go back to the exciting ideas that can lead to the next waves in the economy. the other one is the political environment -- sorry. it can be hard to ignore, but were going to do it. another piece of the political environment, where we had the ability to fix the situation. we know to fix this. we needed a comprehensive dead deal that's big enough to stabilize the debt and we'll remember that. when you're trying to balance the budget. were not very. were not going to be there soon. you have to make sure that that's not faster than the economy and it's on a downward path and the problem is so big or too calm% year to look at every part of the budget. you have to look at defense spending. you have to clearly focused on health care costs, which go faster than the economy. we have to fix our social security system, which makes promises bigger than what we can pay out on the road. we have to raise revenues. we started down the path, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling ta
reported impacts that we have seen. water resources, energy, wildfire, and one of the things you heard in the last discussion and in this one, of the under appreciated aspect of the impact of drought. the loss of ecosystem services as a supporter and supply tourism recreation clean water and clear air. we do not have any sense of what the cost of those multiple impacts are. we know a bit about the insured impacts from agriculture, so therefore what needs to be considered? the indicator that margaret is saying about how people are economically impacted by this critically how they are socially impacted. if we are to put plans into place, we have to ask how do you know they are working? the indicators include the development of peoples capacity to respond. not just the number of plans but what in the plans allows the inclusion of information? that is the kind of indicator, the combination of the physical system and the social and economic that also the capacity engaged for decision-making. that is three aspects that we are familiar with. john powell said in the late 1800's, if you're goin
legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on quote-unquote the energy and force of newtown i would caution not to do that. it's clearly galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and have a serious conversation, but brady bill and the assault weapon ban were done without, quote-unquote, a columbine or what happened in virginia, any of those incidents. i do believe just in the last four years or i would say the last eight years of politics this, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion that has been sitting on the sidelines or the periphery of politics to be focused and this, obviously, tomorrow morning the president's going to introduce his legislation or his package and decide what legislatively he's going to do, what he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. but my small kind of flashing yellow light of caution is when you think of the last time we had success which goes back to '93 and '94
character. lots of friends. things were always happening. a great vivid character. lots of energy. we met, as a matter of fact, in leonard bernstein's apartment. his wife, felicia montealegre at the time, was making anti-war christmas cards, which sounds silly now, of course, but people went to great lengths to be against the war in those days. it was a kind of harmless escapade. we were there covering it, and, of course, we were jockeying for position to interview everybody he and i tangled immediately and started shouting at each other. he said, "i will desist because i'm the gentleman and not because you are a lady." i thought that was a rather remarkable line. i think i burst out laughing. we were very, very good friends he was a wonderful character, maybe one of my closest friends in the world. he went to vietnam. i worked along-side him in vietnam a lot. he then went to tokyo. c-span: who did he work for in vietnam? >> guest: he worked for a couple of people. he worked for nbc radio at one point, he worked for abc television, he worked for wcbs. he was kind of drifting around. he wa
, sierra mist, mugs root beer, amp energy, aquafina, bottled water. if they're health conscious, they might buy naked juice. for breakfast they might buy captain crunch, quaker cereal, aunt jeff my ma's, puffed wheat, ricearoni, lays potato chips, sun chips, tostitos, cracker jacks or ruffles. what the consumer probably doesn't realize, that all of those brands are owned by pepsi. pepsi is the largest, um, food company in the united states, if you want to call those items food. and it's the second largest in the world. or they might buy a nestle product. they had 94 billion in sales and 10.5 billion in profits. pepsi had about 6.4 billion in profits. that's because nestle, it's the biggest food company in the world. they're not just in the u.s. so, you know, basically in every subsector of the food industry we have just a few companies that are controlling all of those brands. twenty companies control the highest percentage of brands in the grocery store. and of those 14 of those brands control organic food. so big food is basically controlling what people eat. then we have the grocery cong
and a variety of energy drinks. as a drink in colombia which is a great flavor but again it's not like drinking red bull. it's a very nice kind of stimulant. it would be much better for you. there's a variety of breads and rolls and there's also this is the bag that is basically cheese puffs the government is distributing to kids through a free breakfast program. the folks at the plant went on about how great these were. i thought they were all full myself but i guess the kids like them and i also confess that i hate the taste but there are a variety of products that have very good uses and should be available not only in these countries but also on the international markets there's a variety of uses beyond what the uses for flavoring another that ricardo points out to in his book is related to the conventions. i was struck this relationship between the u.s. drug czar for decades and the president of coca-cola very cozy relationship, so in the end of the 1961 u.n. single conventional the narcotic drugs and the subsequent 1988 convention make it a criminal offense under the international law so
for the last two years. the energy industry is looking much stronger. consumers are more optimistic than the university of michigan publishes the index of consumer sentiment, which is one of the very best guides with how consumers are feeling. as long as the fiscal policy keeps going, there will be some progress. we still have quite a ways to go before we will be dissatisfied. it is actually taken some of the pressure off of congress to try to address these fiscal challenges. the critics on both sides -- you should give the other guys a chance. >> i will get there. [laughter] >> okay. well, let me first say that as we think about the costs and risks of any policy, we should also think about what we are trying to accomplish and i have made reference already that the federal reserve has a dual mandate from congress to achieve maximum employment. price stability means low inflation we have basically taken that to mean 2% inflation and has been in the very low 2% range and appears to be on track for up to 2%. unemployment, as we have learned discussed, is still quite high. it has been coming
energy and anticipation on what you -- attention on what you admitted in your own testimony a terrible problem. i'm wondering how these experiments will be evaluated, how -- what the learnings will be shared, how the public will be informed of whether or not all these excellent inputs actually yield results and how soon. so i'm wondering what the plan for disseminating best practices if any of these things turn out to be if not the magic bullet, then part of the arsenal that becomes the way we combat sexual violence in the military. pardon the military allusion. >> we'll -- thank you for that question, ma'am. >> that's the first. >> one of our lines of effort is really one that you're really commenting and focusing on here, and that's the line and effort of assessment. and so there are, there are some things in the place here that allow us to -- we recognize we have to continually look at ourself. and what i've actually been sharing with, you know, by colleagues in the services and so forth is that we have to assess our programs with an eye towards taking the best practices and making
people knew what distracted driving was. thanks to a lot of energy and time and people working together, we have come a long way. we still have much to do. today 39 states bans texting while driving and 10 states banned hand-held cell phone use. in the skies we are enhancing safety and cutting delays by moving towards nextgen -- nextgen which maximizes the benefit of gps-based surveillance and we improved outdated pilot flight and duty rules to give commercial passenger pilots the rest they need to operate. in addition to our safety efforts we are fulfilling president obama's bold vision for american rail, laying the foundation for high-speed rail corridors in 34 states and the district of columbia. in california, the nation's first true high-speed rail will break ground this year. four years ago very few people were talking about high-speed passenger rail in america. when the president put $8 billion in economic recovery in the plan that was a billion times more than our country had ever invested in high-speed passenger rail. today it's up to 12 million. the countries that i went to an
a group of people to come to washington and the amount of energy that goes on dhaka to teams beating each other up instead of solving a problem that no matter how much we might disagree on the role and the way to solve it, we know it has to be solved it just seems completely unacceptable so there's sort of those moments where you need the no budget gimmicks if nothing else just to focus attention on we have to work on this until we get it done. estimate i kind of like this idea, lower the base pay and get a bonus that depends upon the performance. that's kind of attractive. yes? >> i write the mitchell report and i want to follow on that with another thought. ross captured when he said a good country, bad management, that governments. it seems to me that if there is any lesson that we get from this panel and other discussions there is a way to fix the balance sheet. it isn't clear that there isn't a way to fix government. in the first panel, the mayor talked about moving it at the speed of business. so there's a question for mr. macdonald. in an earlier life i competed directly against yo
. there is access to energy in central asia. afghanistan needs power. and if we create an interdependency between these countries, especially the countries that are now not on friendly terms with each other, we will enhance the chances of stability a lot more. so there is included, also, as a more expensive project could be pipeline and others, but at least national-grade railroads. fortunately now pakistan is extending its railroad into kandahar and other or or -- herot to connect now across railroad into afghanistan north and south so we can really rebuild afghanistan as a cross roads or a land of trade. that's key. internally, improving access to capital in afghanistan by providing some political incentives in terms of political risk insurance, making credit more available for international companies in afghanistan, allowing some afghan companies to have access to as easier credit, that's -- these are the key issues that could help afghanistan on the economic front. but more importantly, a clear message about the future of afghanistan that will give the investors and everyone else a sense of c
such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experience similar events. >> okay. and going in -- to the effect on auto industry, are there things that have changed in terms of resilience with the auto industry, in terms of the supply chain or things that changed since fiewk fukushima? >> yes, i think there's a tremendous change take place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers. anything beyond the tier two down to event tier five, we didn't have not have any -- [inaudible] and we assume that supply chain shape like pyramids and suppliers take care of several tier two, three, and four. what we found in the case especially the semiconductor companies. it's almost like a spindle shape, and we are very surprised, and therefore, we have to make a -- supply chain even down to a tier five. so this work has immediately start. and what we have found is that there are about 2,000 critical parts where there's on one single suppliers or one special use. and therefore, there's no -- lik
that everybody should rely on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized to have a conversation internally and have a serious conversation, but for the assault weapons ban, were done with columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe in the last four years, the last eight years of politics, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion and appropriate politics to be focused for the president to introduce this legislation or package undecided what is going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point is postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. my small plaintiff caution anything but the last time i had success, goes back in 93 and 94. those were pretty columbine. his entire package fell flat. >> congressman, you had a reading from the nra. you voted for reducing the waiting time for weapons from reduced to one day. do you think we are at a tipping point, but there'll be some kind of a seismic change? >> since the topic of politics, i would add a lot of people lately accredit 1993 crime bill for the reason republ
on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and had a serious conversation. but the assault weapon ban was done without a columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe just in the last four years on the loudspeakers of politics would have been there has made all of us a discussion that is sitting on the sideline to be focused to introduces legislation or package and decide what legislatively he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed. but my small flashing yellow light of caution is anything to laugh time we really had success, which goes back to 93 and 94, those are pretty columbine. his entire package of five. spin a congressman, you had a reading from the nra and he voted for reducing the waiting time from three days to one bag. do you think read a tipping point, that there will be some kind of a seismic change? >> yeah, i do. since the topic is politics and then to add that a lot of people widely credited in 18
is take that energy and focus on getting prepared to run a presidential election at some point, whether that is in a month or two months or six months. the need to be ready to go. of really glad that you brought into the conversation those points because russell has also talk to high touched on that and chris is a political expert that has done a lot of things about venice rose specifically. you can't beat something with nothing. and so the opposition may have problems with the way things a going forward, what is the realistic alternative that they have in the current environment and to the extent that they really want to contest this, what can they do to move forward? >> first let me echo what charles said. it is somewhat intimidating to be in a room with you in knowing follow this will more than i do. i will quote someone who knows venezuela as well as i do, 8-year-old son. oddly, as i have been called at all hours of the day and night, checking my e-mail and my computer constantly, very obsessed with the health of chavez. the other date he says to hell is that president in the way? w
event such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experienced similar events. >> a que. mr. inaba, going back to the effect on the auto industry, are there any changes in return of the resiliency of supply chain or things that have changed since fukushima? >> yes. i think there is a tremendous change taking place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers but anything beyond that, tier two even down to tier 5, we assume that the supply chain is like a sheep of pyramids and the tier one suppliers take share of the two, three and four out what we found in this case especially the same conductor company it is almost like a spindle, and therefore we have to make an infestation of all of the supply chains all the way down to tier five, so this work has started and what we found is there are about 2,000 critical parts where there is only one single supplier or juan special material for use and therefore there is no replace a devotee on stuff like that. so from then onward
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